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Should I be concerned about coyotes?

UNC71-00

Elite
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I live adjacent to a 400 acre county park and I can hear the coyotes at times about 300 yards from the house, but only at night.

I walk my dog- off leash- in this park in the morning- there are 8+ miles of loop trails that wind all through the park. Do I need to worry about him walking up on a pack or even 3 or 4? The dog wanders all over everywhere when we walk.
 

RJ2kWJ

Elite
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But for real OP, a coyote killed my buddies lab up in a park back home. Wasn’t even a contest. I think he let him off the leash for maybe 5 minutes when we were on a bike ride.
 

Oklahoma

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Read this


61+d9l5z6hL.jpg
 

yankmenoodle

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Messages
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I live adjacent to a 400 acre county park and I can hear the coyotes at times about 300 yards from the house, but only at night.

I walk my dog- off leash- in this park in the morning- there are 8+ miles of loop trails that wind all through the park. Do I need to worry about him walking up on a pack or even 3 or 4? The dog wanders all over everywhere when we walk.
Keep your dog near you. My bulldog would wander into the woods when we were walking, and one day he came out with his rear end shredded. He had stitches and staples covering his rear end.
 

hmt5000

Overlord
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Dec 10, 2020
Messages
3,154
I live adjacent to a 400 acre county park and I can hear the coyotes at times about 300 yards from the house, but only at night.

I walk my dog- off leash- in this park in the morning- there are 8+ miles of loop trails that wind all through the park. Do I need to worry about him walking up on a pack or even 3 or 4? The dog wanders all over everywhere when we walk.
Yes. I had a dog that i put in a large pen during the day while I was at work. They dug him out and when he left the pen they bit his front leg and back leg and neck and stretched him out while another coyote tried to rip his balls off. Luckily my neighbors wife was home and shot at them to scare them off and she ran him to the vet for me. Dude was fucked up for a few weeks. The vet explained the injuries to me and what was happening. Teeth marks pretty much backed up what he told me.

The males actually try to castrate their competition and will kill them if they can. They learn to be fearful or fearless pretty quick.... my coyotes learned to fear the fuck out of my property after that. If you hunt or shoot they make remote control calls and flopper bait to attract them. If you kill a few over the year and then at least 1 the next year they will steer clear of your place.,, if they have enough food elsewher. They actually have pack memory and it's been long enough that every coyote that attacked my dog is probably dead but that pack hasn't been back to my property. 200 yards from my property they still see them from time to time.
 

Icculus

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Jan 9, 2021
Messages
44
From what I’ve heard from my redneck friends, a big dog can kick a single coyotes ass but they normally don’t fight like that, they try to separate the dog and then 3-4 coyotes attack. I’d keep em close by.

When my dog was 1-2 I was at our lake house cleaning the dock after a big weekend with friends. My lab was on the dock with me and kept growling at the shore. Next thing I know a coyote is walking down the dock growling at us. My dog takes off after him, when the coyote saw Big Hank coming, he stopped growling had an “oh shit” face and turned around and booked it. I finally caught my dog, threw him in the house and grabbed my gun. The coyote was making the most unique sound in the woods. I could never find him though. I’ve hunted all my life and heard coyotes countless time and never heard something like that. I’m pretty sure he was rabid.
 

GarnetPild

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3,934
We live out in the country and walk our 2 dogs at night with no leash. We all enjoy it alot. Got some LED collars to keep up with the dogs, but they don't stray very far.

I have heard coyotes around, and always am carrying a gun, but reading this thread makes me think when we leave the neighborhood & go onto the wildlife refuge we should pull out the leashes.
 

denn

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Messages
1,656
I live adjacent to a 400 acre county park and I can hear the coyotes at times about 300 yards from the house, but only at night.

I walk my dog- off leash- in this park in the morning- there are 8+ miles of loop trails that wind all through the park. Do I need to worry about him walking up on a pack or even 3 or 4? The dog wanders all over everywhere when we walk.
You should be worried about him walking up on a pack or worse the pack luring him away from you. Wolves (another member of the dog family) will often send out calls that are inviting/non threatening to separate their pray from their human. I'd imagine coyotes do the same thing.

If you have a big dog (100 pounds plus,) a single coyote probably wouldn't even bother to try anything. A pack of them however will do some damage.
 

byrons

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Jan 21, 2021
Messages
79
Interesting thread. I have talked to a fellow whose brother lives on the southern end of the Twin cities in Minny. His yellow lab was out in the yard with his owner watching. A coyote came out of the brush line into the yard with his head down and his tail between his legs as if he was wounded. The lab started to go after him but before he got there three more coyotes came out the brush and all four attacked the lab. It fought them off but ended up with a slashed throat and stomach wounds that were very deep. Nothing to fool with and that was in a metro area.
 

Hb35

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Jan 10, 2021
Messages
53
A average coyote weighs about 35 pounds, any full grown lab would kick the shit out of one, but any canine is dangerous in a pack. Coyotes don’t hunt in packs like wolves, usually alone or as a pair. They do live in family groups at times which is what you hear when they all get to raising hell.

I live in the country. Hear coyotes any night you’re outside. One did kill my Mexican farm hand’s chihuahua, probably, he just saw eye shine, could have been another dog, but I’ve never heard of any other instance around here, and I see one somewhere probably every couple of days.
 

hmt5000

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Interesting thread. I have talked to a fellow whose brother lives on the southern end of the Twin cities in Minny. His yellow lab was out in the yard with his owner watching. A coyote came out of the brush line into the yard with his head down and his tail between his legs as if he was wounded. The lab started to go after him but before he got there three more coyotes came out the brush and all four attacked the lab. It fought them off but ended up with a slashed throat and stomach wounds that were very deep. Nothing to fool with and that was in a metro area.
Thats the trick. Vet told me that the coyotes that dug my dog out were probably females and when my dog went out to "play" the males swooped in to fuck him up. The belly wound was probably going for the balls. I never knew that those bastards were so smart. They also have a thing that if you kill one and he makes a certain death wail that the pack will all breed asap. If wolves were half as crafty as coyotes they would rule the world.
 

Seagulls

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Feb 13, 2021
Messages
56
Believe it or not there are coyotes all over Chicago, even downtown. They’re timid around here for the most part. That said, I have heard stores where they’ve killed small dogs in the northern neighborhoods (Lincoln Square, Ravenswood, Uptown, etc).
Interesting. We have coyotes and fox’s here all around the Vanderbilt/Belmont area of Nashville. The Ring message boards are always warning neighbors they saw one on the camera but we’ve never heard about any pet being killed. Plenty of squirrels, possums and feral cats you’ll see roaming around as well so there’s probably some nature seedy underbelly we don’t know about in the middle of the night.

Just googled and this one was actually in the Nashville convention center bathroom in 2019, which is in the heart of downtown, lol
urn-publicid-ap-org-2eead04856b14a5cbd3fde1dda23bab2Boat_Show_Coyote_75968-375x667.jpg
 

UNC71-00

Elite
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Jan 8, 2021
Messages
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Interesting. We have coyotes and fox’s here all around the Vanderbilt/Belmont area of Nashville. The Ring message boards are always warning neighbors they saw one on the camera but we’ve never heard about any pet being killed. Plenty of squirrels, possums and feral cats you’ll see roaming around as well so there’s probably some nature seedy underbelly we don’t know about in the middle of the night.

Just googled and this one was actually in the Nashville convention center bathroom in 2019, which is in the heart of downtown, lol
urn-publicid-ap-org-2eead04856b14a5cbd3fde1dda23bab2Boat_Show_Coyote_75968-375x667.jpg

Leave him alone- he’s handing out paper towels and working for tips
 

Icculus

Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2021
Messages
44
Interesting. We have coyotes and fox’s here all around the Vanderbilt/Belmont area of Nashville. The Ring message boards are always warning neighbors they saw one on the camera but we’ve never heard about any pet being killed. Plenty of squirrels, possums and feral cats you’ll see roaming around as well so there’s probably some nature seedy underbelly we don’t know about in the middle of the night.

Just googled and this one was actually in the Nashville convention center bathroom in 2019, which is in the heart of downtown, lol
urn-publicid-ap-org-2eead04856b14a5cbd3fde1dda23bab2Boat_Show_Coyote_75968-375x667.jpg

I’m 5 minutes from downtown Charlotte and see deer in my yard, and hear of coyote sightings in the neighborhood all the time. I saw an 8 point in my neighbor’s yard one morning during the rut. Yard man complains about deer droppings in our yard too.

Edit: there’s a good book called Coyote America that talks about how they’ve adapted to live in cities like NYC, Chicago, etc.
 

Seagulls

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Messages
56
Leave him alone- he’s handing out paper towels and working for tips
Lol! I’m actually extremely empathetic to animals that are just trying to figure out and adjust to surviving in our ever encroaching development. Was happy to read the police were going to euthanize it but one lady officer got him in the back of her patrol car and had him released out in his natural habitat away from the city. Apparently they are attracted to our trash and small pets when we make their natural food source scarce.
 

Seagulls

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Messages
56
I’m 5 minutes from downtown Charlotte and see deer in my yard, and hear of coyote sightings in the neighborhood all the time. I saw an 8 point in my neighbor’s yard one morning during the rut. Yard man complains about deer droppings in our yard too.

Edit: there’s a good book called Coyote America that talks about how they’ve adapted to live in cities like NYC, Chicago, etc.
That would be an interesting read. Thanks for the recommendation. Amazing to watch something figure out how to adapt to survive.
 

The_Goose

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Messages
243
Interesting. We have coyotes and fox’s here all around the Vanderbilt/Belmont area of Nashville. The Ring message boards are always warning neighbors they saw one on the camera but we’ve never heard about any pet being killed. Plenty of squirrels, possums and feral cats you’ll see roaming around as well so there’s probably some nature seedy underbelly we don’t know about in the middle of the night.

Just googled and this one was actually in the Nashville convention center bathroom in 2019, which is in the heart of downtown, lol
urn-publicid-ap-org-2eead04856b14a5cbd3fde1dda23bab2Boat_Show_Coyote_75968-375x667.jpg

There are hundreds of them living in the parking garages at Soldier Field. Remember seeing a family after parking some years ago. Some little boy Packers fan thought they were dogs and wanted to pet them lol.
 

tsumatt06

Leader
Joined
Jan 12, 2021
Messages
88
Interesting. We have coyotes and fox’s here all around the Vanderbilt/Belmont area of Nashville. The Ring message boards are always warning neighbors they saw one on the camera but we’ve never heard about any pet being killed. Plenty of squirrels, possums and feral cats you’ll see roaming around as well so there’s probably some nature seedy underbelly we don’t know about in the middle of the night.

Just googled and this one was actually in the Nashville convention center bathroom in 2019, which is in the heart of downtown, lol
urn-publicid-ap-org-2eead04856b14a5cbd3fde1dda23bab2Boat_Show_Coyote_75968-375x667.jpg
We have a couple feral cats in our neighborhood that no one messes with because they help with mice, rats, moles, etc. Coyotes are pretty common on my ring cam in suburban Arlington, TX. I do have a fagit armadillo living under my shed that only comes out around 3am to fuck up my lawn. Probably gonna trap him the next few days and fill in the holes he's burrowed.
 

22*43*51

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Unless they build them bigger in some places a single coyote isn't going to kill a Lab one on one.
 

scanodd

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Why Killing Coyotes Doesn’t Work


The coyote, our unique Song Dog who has existed in North America since the Pleistocene Epoch, is the most persecuted native carnivore in North America and the most frequent victim of wildlife killing contests. Killed for prizes, poisoned, trapped, and aerial gunned, an estimated half a million coyotes—one per minute—are slaughtered every year in the United States. The best available, peer-reviewed science shows that indiscriminately killing coyotes is counterproductive and a threat to healthy ecosystems. There is no credible evidence that indiscriminate killing of coyotes effectively serves any beneficial wildlife management purpose. Over 70 prominent conservation scientists condemn coyote killing contests— their signed statement is available here. Coyotes play a crucial ecological role and provide a range of free, natural ecological services in urban and rural settings. Coyotes directly or indirectly help to control disease transmission, keep rodent populations in check, consume animal carcasses, increase biodiversity, remove sick animals from the gene pool, and protect crops. Unexploited coyote populations can contribute to ecosystem health through trophic cascade effects such as indirectly protecting ground-nesting birds from smaller carnivores and increasing the biological diversity of plant and wildlife communities.1 State wildlife management agencies across the country recognize the benefits that coyotes provide to ecosystems. Indiscriminately killing coyotes does not reduce their populations—in fact, it can have the opposite effect. It is nearly impossible to permanently reduce coyote populations.2 More than 100 years of coyote killing has failed to do that. Since 1850—when mass killings of coyotes began— coyotes’ range has tripled in the United States.3 Indiscriminate killing of coyotes stimulates increases in their populations by disrupting their social structure, which encourages more breeding and migration.4 Unexploited coyote populations are selfregulating based on the availability of food and habitat and territorial defense by resident family groups. Typically, only the dominant pair in a pack of coyotes reproduces, and they behaviorally suppress reproduction among subordinate members of the group. When one or both members of the dominant pair are killed, socially bonded packs break up, and subordinate members disperse, find mates and reproduce. More coyotes breed at younger ages, and more pups survive following a temporary increase in available prey. These factors work synergistically to increase coyote populations following exploitation events

It’s impossible to completely eradicate coyotes from an area.6 New coyotes will quickly replace coyotes who have been removed. Coyote pairs hold territories, which leaves single coyotes (“floaters”) continually looking for new habitat to occupy.7 There is no credible evidence that indiscriminate killing of coyotes succeeds in increasing the abundance of game species such as deer or pheasants. Rather than focusing on any one species, coyotes are opportunists who eat a diverse diet including small mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, insects, fruit, and vegetables. Rabbits and rodents are generally their top choice.8 In response to hunters’ concerns that predators diminish populations of small game animals, the Pennsylvania Game Commission (PGC) emphatically stated in 2016 that “[predators] don’t compete with our hunters for game” and “to pretend that predator control can return small game hunting to the state is a false prophecy.”9 The PGC emphasized that habitat protection is the most important factor in determining small game abundance.10 The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) similarly found that “most coyote diet studies document low to no prevalence of wild turkey or other game birds in diets,” and that coyotes can benefit duck, quail, and waterfowl populations by controlling the presence of smaller predators like raccoons and foxes that prey on game birds and their nests.11 Killing coyotes also does not protect larger game animals such as deer. Deer populations are reliant upon a host of other factors including habitat, shelter, nutrition, and reproductive opportunity.12 Comprehensive studies, including those conducted in Colorado13 and Idaho,14 show that killing native carnivores fails to grow deer herds. The NCWRC has stated, “while predation on adult deer has been documented, it is uncommon, and hunter harvest remains as the primary source of adult mortality in hunted populations” and “the most effective method to increase or stabilize deer numbers at statewide and regional scales is through regulatory changes in season lengths, bag limits, and timing of harvest.”15 Claims that coyotes attack humans and pets and threaten livestock are greatly exaggerated. A recent study of coyote attacks on humans over a 38-year period (1977-2015) found only 367 documented attacks by non-rabid coyotes in Canada and the U.S., two of which resulted in death.16 In comparison, there are more than 4.5 million dog bites annually in the U.S., approximately 800,000 of which require medical attention.17 While there is little data regarding how many pets are killed by coyotes annually, simple measures can be taken to greatly increase pet safety.18 Most coyotes do not prey on livestock. According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (“USDA”) data, livestock losses to carnivores are minuscule. In 2015, less than 0.39 percent of the U.S. cattle and sheep inventories (including calves and lambs) were lost to all carnivores combined—including coyotes, wolves, cougars, bears, vultures, dogs, and unknown carnivores.19 The predominant sources of mortality to livestock, by far, are non-predator causes including disease, illness, birthing problems, and weather.20 Wildlife killing contests and other indiscriminate, lethal control methods will not prevent conflicts with humans, pets or livestock—and may increase them. Disrupting the coyote family structure may increase coyote attacks. Exploited coyote populations tend to have younger, less experienced coyotes that haven’t been taught appropriate hunting behaviors. These coyotes are more likely to prey on easy targets like livestock or pets. Additionally, exploited coyote packs are more likely to have increased numbers of yearlings reproducing and higher pup survival. Feeding pups is a significant motivation for coyotes to switch from killing small and medium-sized prey to killing sheep.21 Open hunts and killing contests do not target specific, problem-causing coyotes. Most killing contests target coyotes in woodlands and grasslands where conflicts with humans, livestock, and pets are minimal—not coyotes who have become habituated by human-provided attractants such as unsecured garbage, pet food, or livestock carcasses. Prevention—not lethal control—is the best method for minimizing conflicts with coyotes in urban and rural settings. Eliminating access to easy food sources, such as bird seed and garbage, supervising pets while outside, and keeping cats indoors reduces conflicts with pets and humans.22 Practicing good animal husbandry and using strategic, nonlethal predator control methods to protect livestock (such as electric fences, guard animals, and removing dead livestock) are more effective than lethal control at preventing conflicts.23 For more information, see Project Coyote’s Coyote Friendly Communities™ program and Ranching with Wildlife program on our website ProjectCoyote.org
 

22*43*51

Boob Enthusiast
Founder
Patron
Joined
Jan 7, 2021
Messages
8,669
Why Killing Coyotes Doesn’t Work


The coyote, our unique Song Dog who has existed in North America since the Pleistocene Epoch, is the most persecuted native carnivore in North America and the most frequent victim of wildlife killing contests. Killed for prizes, poisoned, trapped, and aerial gunned, an estimated half a million coyotes—one per minute—are slaughtered every year in the United States. The best available, peer-reviewed science shows that indiscriminately killing coyotes is counterproductive and a threat to healthy ecosystems. There is no credible evidence that indiscriminate killing of coyotes effectively serves any beneficial wildlife management purpose. Over 70 prominent conservation scientists condemn coyote killing contests— their signed statement is available here. Coyotes play a crucial ecological role and provide a range of free, natural ecological services in urban and rural settings. Coyotes directly or indirectly help to control disease transmission, keep rodent populations in check, consume animal carcasses, increase biodiversity, remove sick animals from the gene pool, and protect crops. Unexploited coyote populations can contribute to ecosystem health through trophic cascade effects such as indirectly protecting ground-nesting birds from smaller carnivores and increasing the biological diversity of plant and wildlife communities.1 State wildlife management agencies across the country recognize the benefits that coyotes provide to ecosystems. Indiscriminately killing coyotes does not reduce their populations—in fact, it can have the opposite effect. It is nearly impossible to permanently reduce coyote populations.2 More than 100 years of coyote killing has failed to do that. Since 1850—when mass killings of coyotes began— coyotes’ range has tripled in the United States.3 Indiscriminate killing of coyotes stimulates increases in their populations by disrupting their social structure, which encourages more breeding and migration.4 Unexploited coyote populations are selfregulating based on the availability of food and habitat and territorial defense by resident family groups. Typically, only the dominant pair in a pack of coyotes reproduces, and they behaviorally suppress reproduction among subordinate members of the group. When one or both members of the dominant pair are killed, socially bonded packs break up, and subordinate members disperse, find mates and reproduce. More coyotes breed at younger ages, and more pups survive following a temporary increase in available prey. These factors work synergistically to increase coyote populations following exploitation events

It’s impossible to completely eradicate coyotes from an area.6 New coyotes will quickly replace coyotes who have been removed. Coyote pairs hold territories, which leaves single coyotes (“floaters”) continually looking for new habitat to occupy.7 There is no credible evidence that indiscriminate killing of coyotes succeeds in increasing the abundance of game species such as deer or pheasants. Rather than focusing on any one species, coyotes are opportunists who eat a diverse diet including small mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, insects, fruit, and vegetables. Rabbits and rodents are generally their top choice.8 In response to hunters’ concerns that predators diminish populations of small game animals, the Pennsylvania Game Commission (PGC) emphatically stated in 2016 that “[predators] don’t compete with our hunters for game” and “to pretend that predator control can return small game hunting to the state is a false prophecy.”9 The PGC emphasized that habitat protection is the most important factor in determining small game abundance.10 The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) similarly found that “most coyote diet studies document low to no prevalence of wild turkey or other game birds in diets,” and that coyotes can benefit duck, quail, and waterfowl populations by controlling the presence of smaller predators like raccoons and foxes that prey on game birds and their nests.11 Killing coyotes also does not protect larger game animals such as deer. Deer populations are reliant upon a host of other factors including habitat, shelter, nutrition, and reproductive opportunity.12 Comprehensive studies, including those conducted in Colorado13 and Idaho,14 show that killing native carnivores fails to grow deer herds. The NCWRC has stated, “while predation on adult deer has been documented, it is uncommon, and hunter harvest remains as the primary source of adult mortality in hunted populations” and “the most effective method to increase or stabilize deer numbers at statewide and regional scales is through regulatory changes in season lengths, bag limits, and timing of harvest.”15 Claims that coyotes attack humans and pets and threaten livestock are greatly exaggerated. A recent study of coyote attacks on humans over a 38-year period (1977-2015) found only 367 documented attacks by non-rabid coyotes in Canada and the U.S., two of which resulted in death.16 In comparison, there are more than 4.5 million dog bites annually in the U.S., approximately 800,000 of which require medical attention.17 While there is little data regarding how many pets are killed by coyotes annually, simple measures can be taken to greatly increase pet safety.18 Most coyotes do not prey on livestock. According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (“USDA”) data, livestock losses to carnivores are minuscule. In 2015, less than 0.39 percent of the U.S. cattle and sheep inventories (including calves and lambs) were lost to all carnivores combined—including coyotes, wolves, cougars, bears, vultures, dogs, and unknown carnivores.19 The predominant sources of mortality to livestock, by far, are non-predator causes including disease, illness, birthing problems, and weather.20 Wildlife killing contests and other indiscriminate, lethal control methods will not prevent conflicts with humans, pets or livestock—and may increase them. Disrupting the coyote family structure may increase coyote attacks. Exploited coyote populations tend to have younger, less experienced coyotes that haven’t been taught appropriate hunting behaviors. These coyotes are more likely to prey on easy targets like livestock or pets. Additionally, exploited coyote packs are more likely to have increased numbers of yearlings reproducing and higher pup survival. Feeding pups is a significant motivation for coyotes to switch from killing small and medium-sized prey to killing sheep.21 Open hunts and killing contests do not target specific, problem-causing coyotes. Most killing contests target coyotes in woodlands and grasslands where conflicts with humans, livestock, and pets are minimal—not coyotes who have become habituated by human-provided attractants such as unsecured garbage, pet food, or livestock carcasses. Prevention—not lethal control—is the best method for minimizing conflicts with coyotes in urban and rural settings. Eliminating access to easy food sources, such as bird seed and garbage, supervising pets while outside, and keeping cats indoors reduces conflicts with pets and humans.22 Practicing good animal husbandry and using strategic, nonlethal predator control methods to protect livestock (such as electric fences, guard animals, and removing dead livestock) are more effective than lethal control at preventing conflicts.23 For more information, see Project Coyote’s Coyote Friendly Communities™ program and Ranching with Wildlife program on our website ProjectCoyote.org

But it sure is fun.
 

UNC71-00

Elite
Founder
Joined
Jan 8, 2021
Messages
1,431
Why Killing Coyotes Doesn’t Work


The coyote, our unique Song Dog who has existed in North America since the Pleistocene Epoch, is the most persecuted native carnivore in North America and the most frequent victim of wildlife killing contests. Killed for prizes, poisoned, trapped, and aerial gunned, an estimated half a million coyotes—one per minute—are slaughtered every year in the United States. The best available, peer-reviewed science shows that indiscriminately killing coyotes is counterproductive and a threat to healthy ecosystems. There is no credible evidence that indiscriminate killing of coyotes effectively serves any beneficial wildlife management purpose. Over 70 prominent conservation scientists condemn coyote killing contests— their signed statement is available here. Coyotes play a crucial ecological role and provide a range of free, natural ecological services in urban and rural settings. Coyotes directly or indirectly help to control disease transmission, keep rodent populations in check, consume animal carcasses, increase biodiversity, remove sick animals from the gene pool, and protect crops. Unexploited coyote populations can contribute to ecosystem health through trophic cascade effects such as indirectly protecting ground-nesting birds from smaller carnivores and increasing the biological diversity of plant and wildlife communities.1 State wildlife management agencies across the country recognize the benefits that coyotes provide to ecosystems. Indiscriminately killing coyotes does not reduce their populations—in fact, it can have the opposite effect. It is nearly impossible to permanently reduce coyote populations.2 More than 100 years of coyote killing has failed to do that. Since 1850—when mass killings of coyotes began— coyotes’ range has tripled in the United States.3 Indiscriminate killing of coyotes stimulates increases in their populations by disrupting their social structure, which encourages more breeding and migration.4 Unexploited coyote populations are selfregulating based on the availability of food and habitat and territorial defense by resident family groups. Typically, only the dominant pair in a pack of coyotes reproduces, and they behaviorally suppress reproduction among subordinate members of the group. When one or both members of the dominant pair are killed, socially bonded packs break up, and subordinate members disperse, find mates and reproduce. More coyotes breed at younger ages, and more pups survive following a temporary increase in available prey. These factors work synergistically to increase coyote populations following exploitation events

It’s impossible to completely eradicate coyotes from an area.6 New coyotes will quickly replace coyotes who have been removed. Coyote pairs hold territories, which leaves single coyotes (“floaters”) continually looking for new habitat to occupy.7 There is no credible evidence that indiscriminate killing of coyotes succeeds in increasing the abundance of game species such as deer or pheasants. Rather than focusing on any one species, coyotes are opportunists who eat a diverse diet including small mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, insects, fruit, and vegetables. Rabbits and rodents are generally their top choice.8 In response to hunters’ concerns that predators diminish populations of small game animals, the Pennsylvania Game Commission (PGC) emphatically stated in 2016 that “[predators] don’t compete with our hunters for game” and “to pretend that predator control can return small game hunting to the state is a false prophecy.”9 The PGC emphasized that habitat protection is the most important factor in determining small game abundance.10 The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) similarly found that “most coyote diet studies document low to no prevalence of wild turkey or other game birds in diets,” and that coyotes can benefit duck, quail, and waterfowl populations by controlling the presence of smaller predators like raccoons and foxes that prey on game birds and their nests.11 Killing coyotes also does not protect larger game animals such as deer. Deer populations are reliant upon a host of other factors including habitat, shelter, nutrition, and reproductive opportunity.12 Comprehensive studies, including those conducted in Colorado13 and Idaho,14 show that killing native carnivores fails to grow deer herds. The NCWRC has stated, “while predation on adult deer has been documented, it is uncommon, and hunter harvest remains as the primary source of adult mortality in hunted populations” and “the most effective method to increase or stabilize deer numbers at statewide and regional scales is through regulatory changes in season lengths, bag limits, and timing of harvest.”15 Claims that coyotes attack humans and pets and threaten livestock are greatly exaggerated. A recent study of coyote attacks on humans over a 38-year period (1977-2015) found only 367 documented attacks by non-rabid coyotes in Canada and the U.S., two of which resulted in death.16 In comparison, there are more than 4.5 million dog bites annually in the U.S., approximately 800,000 of which require medical attention.17 While there is little data regarding how many pets are killed by coyotes annually, simple measures can be taken to greatly increase pet safety.18 Most coyotes do not prey on livestock. According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (“USDA”) data, livestock losses to carnivores are minuscule. In 2015, less than 0.39 percent of the U.S. cattle and sheep inventories (including calves and lambs) were lost to all carnivores combined—including coyotes, wolves, cougars, bears, vultures, dogs, and unknown carnivores.19 The predominant sources of mortality to livestock, by far, are non-predator causes including disease, illness, birthing problems, and weather.20 Wildlife killing contests and other indiscriminate, lethal control methods will not prevent conflicts with humans, pets or livestock—and may increase them. Disrupting the coyote family structure may increase coyote attacks. Exploited coyote populations tend to have younger, less experienced coyotes that haven’t been taught appropriate hunting behaviors. These coyotes are more likely to prey on easy targets like livestock or pets. Additionally, exploited coyote packs are more likely to have increased numbers of yearlings reproducing and higher pup survival. Feeding pups is a significant motivation for coyotes to switch from killing small and medium-sized prey to killing sheep.21 Open hunts and killing contests do not target specific, problem-causing coyotes. Most killing contests target coyotes in woodlands and grasslands where conflicts with humans, livestock, and pets are minimal—not coyotes who have become habituated by human-provided attractants such as unsecured garbage, pet food, or livestock carcasses. Prevention—not lethal control—is the best method for minimizing conflicts with coyotes in urban and rural settings. Eliminating access to easy food sources, such as bird seed and garbage, supervising pets while outside, and keeping cats indoors reduces conflicts with pets and humans.22 Practicing good animal husbandry and using strategic, nonlethal predator control methods to protect livestock (such as electric fences, guard animals, and removing dead livestock) are more effective than lethal control at preventing conflicts.23 For more information, see Project Coyote’s Coyote Friendly Communities™ program and Ranching with Wildlife program on our website ProjectCoyote.org

I bet the person who wrote this also thinks that the east coast will be underwater in 10 years if we don’t quit driving cars.
 

hmt5000

Overlord
Founder
Joined
Dec 10, 2020
Messages
3,154
Unless they build them bigger in some places a single coyote isn't going to kill a Lab one on one.
They crossbreed with dogs here. The coyotes around here in the 90's were half the size they are now. Buddy of mine killed one that we thought was a German Shepard at first. Fox are still tiny but their numbers are climbing fast.
 

Razrback5

Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2021
Messages
10
I need to get a few of you guys to come down and help out. I’ll send a pic of one of our hog hunts next one we have. A good night with 3 guys can kill 15 to 20

Fukkin A. Killing coyote and hogs is a great time. Don’t do it often enough to buy thermal but spotlight and aimpoint works too.
 

HumasButthole

Leader
Joined
Dec 2, 2020
Messages
41
FYI, YouTube videos of people running coyote dogs is some of the best viewing the inner-net has to offer*

Seeing a couple Greyhounds fvck up a few coyotes is literally watching poetic justice
 

Yep00

Leader
Joined
Jan 9, 2021
Messages
93
FYI, YouTube videos of people running coyote dogs is some of the best viewing the inner-net has to offer*

Seeing a couple Greyhounds fvck up a few coyotes is literally watching poetic justice
You get a like because you said inner-net... not sure why that got me but it did, guess it's the wine.
 

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