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Are solar panels worth the money now?

hmt5000

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Been debating getting a small set up for years but when you run the numbers it just isn't cost effective. Thinking about energy cost spiking the next few years and probable disruptions in service, I'm starting to think I should just go ahead and get a small system to run the Fridge and a few lights.

Anyone familiar with solar that can give me an idea what to avoid and what to make sure you do?
 

Long cat

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If your grid power goes out the solar panels turn off. This is a safety requirement to make sure they don’t back feed the utility and kill somebody working on the lines.

Make sure you know the laws and rules in your state. In Florida 10kW is a magic number - anything under is no big deal, anything over requires utility review and approval which can be easy or can be impossible. It’s up tHe utility which.

performance depends heavily on roof orientation, size and shading. Use this, it will give you an idea.
https://pvwatts.nrel.gov/
 

hmt5000

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If your grid power goes out the solar panels turn off. This is a safety requirement to make sure they don’t back feed the utility and kill somebody working on the lines.

Make sure you know the laws and rules in your state. In Florida 10kW is a magic number - anything under is no big deal, anything over requires utility review and approval which can be easy or can be impossible. It’s up tHe utility which.

performance depends heavily on roof orientation, size and shading. Use this, it will give you an idea.
https://pvwatts.nrel.gov/
Yea. Im mainly wanting to get it for power outages. I'd like to get my money back during summer but winter and spring storms can knock out electric for a bit. Thanks for the link though. Im definitely thinking this summer might be the time to do it if for no other reason than they will probably give a hell of a tax rebate.
 

Fever757

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Unless you are a left wing loon, don't waste your money on solar, it's complete shit.

For $20k you can get one of these and you'll not have to worry about power again. My parents and sister have one of these down in Brazoria county here in Texas (South of Houston). I think they shelled out about $20k and it does not take up much room in your back yard.

Here is the link to the company they bought their generators from.

 
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No it's a scam at best and that includes the most efficient ones. They need to be replaced fairly quickly, high upfront costs for the materials and labor, low efficiency and to dependent on weather, many issues while you own them, etc.

I decided to make my own to use them to store energy in many batteries as a backup to my main sources. purchased a geoengineering kit and I'm currently buidling this now. I also installed a propane tank as a backup to my backups. Lastly, after I have my homes delivered to my property I am considering using water as energy for my generators, and or using magnets for another source of energy. I learned how to create these based off patents that never were accepted by the government. I found a model in Austrialia that was approved but for some reason never was sold to the masses. So I will have DIY this as well.

Also, there are some people who make videos on bit chute on how to make these alternative or upgrades for various forms of energy. The number 1 source of energy for my place will be hydroelectric as I have access to a small fast flowing river. So for me the best forms of energy in order is:
1.) Hydroelectric: the river source is infinite, and the simple parts will last a long time
1 A.) Generator that runs on water: It's excellent in warm weather I just need to make some tweaks for it during the wintertime. I have an infinite supply of water, so I'm not concerned about that.
2.) Magnetic: the small parts can break down quickly which is why I have it in second
3.) Geothermal: Takes more work than all the others, fixing issues will be a pain. I'm having a terrible time digging since my back is in poor shape and I am so far out in the woods I can't just call the Mexicans to help me out like I used to. lol
4.) Solar: Sunny where I live but will need to create new panels very soon since they don't last long at all.
5.) Propane: What I will use while I build up the property and wait for my homes.

Another form of energy I didn't mention is from the woodstove (which the Jews are trying to ban). Well, there is a converter that you can place on top of the woodstov which converts the heat into electricity. Depending on how hot your stove gets it can run many large appliances in the home.

I am having a difficult time
 

TheRealJohnCooper

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Been debating getting a small set up for years but when you run the numbers it just isn't cost effective. Thinking about energy cost spiking the next few years and probable disruptions in service, I'm starting to think I should just go ahead and get a small system to run the Fridge and a few lights.

Anyone familiar with solar that can give me an idea what to avoid and what to make sure you do?
No.
 

LVRebel

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Yea. Im mainly wanting to get it for power outages. I'd like to get my money back during summer but winter and spring storms can knock out electric for a bit. Thanks for the link though. Im definitely thinking this summer might be the time to do it if for no other reason than they will probably give a hell of a tax rebate.
As was said previously, if the power goes out, the solar won't work, unless you have designed your system in a specific way, and have a generator that you can turn on at the same time.

I don't recall the exact specifics but was annoyed when I found this out as well. You'd need to route the wiring in such a way that you could turn a switch to remove your house from 'the grid', and make it an internal loop that powers your house. From what I understand, the problem is you need an electrical change in the system first, or the solar won't actually transmit any electricity. That's where the generator comes in. You'd need to have a plug that could run the generator into this internal loop, which creates the current, and allows the solar energy to also flow, thus powering the house.
 

TopHook

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Been debating getting a small set up for years but when you run the numbers it just isn't cost effective. Thinking about energy cost spiking the next few years and probable disruptions in service, I'm starting to think I should just go ahead and get a small system to run the Fridge and a few lights.

Anyone familiar with solar that can give me an idea what to avoid and what to make sure you do?
Had a guy that installs then and does not recommend them on your roof. Hope this helps.

Parents have some. They did get rid of their pool which helped with electric cost which seemed to be a big help but they say it's has probably cut their bill from about 400 to 150.
 

hmt5000

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Had a guy that installs then and does not recommend them on your roof. Hope this helps.

Parents have some. They did get rid of their pool which helped with electric cost which seemed to be a big help but they say it's has probably cut their bill from about 400 to 150.
Yea. I'm going to build a stand for them on my back fence. I've bought the panels and will install and build in the spring. Batteries are fucking ridiculous now. I have a couple batteries for a large tractor that I'll use for now until the price comes down on lithium a battery.
 

hmt5000

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If your grid power goes out the solar panels turn off. This is a safety requirement to make sure they don’t back feed the utility and kill somebody working on the lines.

Make sure you know the laws and rules in your state. In Florida 10kW is a magic number - anything under is no big deal, anything over requires utility review and approval which can be easy or can be impossible. It’s up tHe utility which.

performance depends heavily on roof orientation, size and shading. Use this, it will give you an idea.
https://pvwatts.nrel.gov/
Been testing on my first purchase and a few things I have learned.


Go 24v solar panels starting out. they make inverters that let you charge a battery and feed the grid for 24v. 24v batteries are better and easy to purchase. More power for the money but a bit higher on initial cost.

We had 8 days of no electric after high winds during a storm. I was able to power my freezer and fridge for a few hours a day and run the sump pump just on the 12v ones I had and 2 batteries. Not perfect but I didn't lose all my meat I had in the deep freeze and I was able to drain the basement when I woke up the next morning.

My freaking propane generator wouldn't start for shit and that is the good thing with solar backup. You at least have a few hours of electric per day.
 
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Been testing on my first purchase and a few things I have learned.


Go 24v solar panels starting out. they make inverters that let you charge a battery and feed the grid for 24v. 24v batteries are better and easy to purchase. More power for the money but a bit higher on initial cost.

We had 8 days of no electric after high winds during a storm. I was able to power my freezer and fridge for a few hours a day and run the sump pump just on the 12v ones I had and 2 batteries. Not perfect but I didn't lose all my meat I had in the deep freeze and I was able to drain the basement when I woke up the next morning.

My freaking propane generator wouldn't start for shit and that is the good thing with solar backup. You at least have a few hours of electric per day.
Your first mistake was having a propane generator.
 
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Been testing on my first purchase and a few things I have learned.


Go 24v solar panels starting out. they make inverters that let you charge a battery and feed the grid for 24v. 24v batteries are better and easy to purchase. More power for the money but a bit higher on initial cost.

We had 8 days of no electric after high winds during a storm. I was able to power my freezer and fridge for a few hours a day and run the sump pump just on the 12v ones I had and 2 batteries. Not perfect but I didn't lose all my meat I had in the deep freeze and I was able to drain the basement when I woke up the next morning.

My freaking propane generator wouldn't start for shit and that is the good thing with solar backup. You at least have a few hours of electric per day.
So far the solar panels I use on my off grid place have been great for appliances and somewhat reliable due to location. I did my best to proof them from extreme weather conditions and so far so good. I see these as just a 4th or 5th option at best. My main source of energy is Geothermal which costed 25k in parts and I did 90% of the labor. I finally got it up and running this year which is why I dissapeared for a few months. I also have a propane tank as backup fuel source as well.

My next project will be to build a hydroelectric generator. I do this since building things is fun, I have the free time and I will know how to trouble shoot since I created the device. I normally review 5 different models first then imagine one myself in my head and attempt to fine tune it and optimize it with visualization. If necessary, I'll use an Engineering software to set up diagrams. I have a small river that runs through the property, but it has sufficient depth and speed to provide a decent amount of power.

1.) The next two sources I will work on is a electromagnetic generator:

2.) Pulling out electricity out of the either aka electromagnetic. Now most sources like Wikipedia or the encyclopedias will say these structures in various locations were for religious purposes. This is false these antenna's are and were used to harness energy from the either. The inside was consisting of metal geometric shapes and the outside of the structures normally have cooling pools. The higher the rod the more power is collected.

.





Other methods:
Converting water into power : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JuxQLEDccsU
I love this since I have an endless supply of water (river, well, rain collection, etc).


poop power: Using my animals for more than just food, fertilizer and clothing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Oqlqu5syP8
energy from the earth: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BF0CS8aY1CY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_IerZ3JByO

Alternators generating electricity to power your home.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpvXEp1Idis


Overall, my goal is to create as many sources of power as possible in case 1 or more breakdown and need time for repairs or replacement. I will EMP proof the house as well. I'll have to start creating batteries to store all the excess energy. During times of hyperinflation the electricity skyrockets faster than anything else over historical records. I could always use this stored energy to barter as well. As for energy storage I've seen some models on unlimited storage times using various methods. Of course none of these creations have patents because we have designed obsolescence for essentially everything now.

After completing my energy projects, I'll have energy and filtered water as well as long term food storage and animals as food. I'll have to start planting fruit, squash and sweet potatoes. I'll start some trees this year but I'll have more time after my other projects are complete. I mostly live off meat products for now which isn't ideal but it does the job.
 

TopHook

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Yea. Im mainly wanting to get it for power outages. I'd like to get my money back during summer but winter and spring storms can knock out electric for a bit. Thanks for the link though. Im definitely thinking this summer might be the time to do it if for no other reason than they will probably give a hell of a tax rebate.
Get a generac.
 

Rebarcock.

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So far the solar panels I use on my off grid place have been great for appliances and somewhat reliable due to location. I did my best to proof them from extreme weather conditions and so far so good. I see these as just a 4th or 5th option at best. My main source of energy is Geothermal which costed 25k in parts and I did 90% of the labor. I finally got it up and running this year which is why I dissapeared for a few months. I also have a propane tank as backup fuel source as well.

My next project will be to build a hydroelectric generator. I do this since building things is fun, I have the free time and I will know how to trouble shoot since I created the device. I normally review 5 different models first then imagine one myself in my head and attempt to fine tune it and optimize it with visualization. If necessary, I'll use an Engineering software to set up diagrams. I have a small river that runs through the property, but it has sufficient depth and speed to provide a decent amount of power.

1.) The next two sources I will work on is a electromagnetic generator:

2.) Pulling out electricity out of the either aka electromagnetic. Now most sources like Wikipedia or the encyclopedias will say these structures in various locations were for religious purposes. This is false these antenna's are and were used to harness energy from the either. The inside was consisting of metal geometric shapes and the outside of the structures normally have cooling pools. The higher the rod the more power is collected.

.





Other methods:
Converting water into power : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JuxQLEDccsU
I love this since I have an endless supply of water (river, well, rain collection, etc).


poop power: Using my animals for more than just food, fertilizer and clothing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Oqlqu5syP8
energy from the earth: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BF0CS8aY1CY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_IerZ3JByO

Alternators generating electricity to power your home.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpvXEp1Idis


Overall, my goal is to create as many sources of power as possible in case 1 or more breakdown and need time for repairs or replacement. I will EMP proof the house as well. I'll have to start creating batteries to store all the excess energy. During times of hyperinflation the electricity skyrockets faster than anything else over historical records. I could always use this stored energy to barter as well. As for energy storage I've seen some models on unlimited storage times using various methods. Of course none of these creations have patents because we have designed obsolescence for essentially everything now.

After completing my energy projects, I'll have energy and filtered water as well as long term food storage and animals as food. I'll have to start planting fruit, squash and sweet potatoes. I'll start some trees this year but I'll have more time after my other projects are complete. I mostly live off meat products for now which isn't ideal but it does the job.

Get off my porch but 1st Start a prepping thread
 

Stoneynsc1

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I have 16 kilowatts of solar panels and three powerwalls. I haven’t paid an electric bill over 25 dollars in 4 years and the only way I know if we have a power outage is when the powerwalls send an email to let me know. I live in hurricane country, coastal SC. I don’t know how they would work farther north but theyve been great here.
 

LVRebel

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I have 16 kilowatts of solar panels and three powerwalls. I haven’t paid an electric bill over 25 dollars in 4 years and the only way I know if we have a power outage is when the powerwalls send an email to let me know. I live in hurricane country, coastal SC. I don’t know how they would work farther north but theyve been great here.
Does your power still run if the electricity is off for longer, say like a week? I have solar too, but after the fact, found out that it will not power the house in the event of a power outage, due to the lack of a current running through the system.

So yeah, you have the power wall, which will help you for a short time, as long as those still have power, but will those power wall batteries still charge when the power is off? I could be wrong, but depending on how they're wired, I believe the answer is no.

You're situation is better than mine, but still may not be a long term solution in a major catastrophic event.
 

imprimis

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The economics have never worked when you add the monthly cost of the panels.

You can bet your ass the OBiden admin will include these with their natural gas ovens, gas heaters, dishwashers and propane elimination proposals. How will Generac run if there is no natural gas or propane available?
 

Stoneynsc1

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The powerwalls are charged by the solar panels. I can disconnect from the power company and go off grid if necessary. I also am set up to charge the powerwalls from a generator. I really can’t complain so far. It was expensive to install but it’s nice for the peace of mind if we get another hurricane or ice storm.

I send power back to Duke energy every month but July, August and September. So the 9 months of credits help offset those months that I use more than I make.
 

ChicagoFats

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I have 16 kilowatts of solar panels and three powerwalls. I haven’t paid an electric bill over 25 dollars in 4 years and the only way I know if we have a power outage is when the powerwalls send an email to let me know. I live in hurricane country, coastal SC. I don’t know how they would work farther north but theyve been great here.

Can you tell us more about what is required to install and about how much it cost to install?
 

Stoneynsc1

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I had two different systems installed. I bought an Enphase system the first time, around 11kw worth of panels but no storage. These worked well but I had no storage. Duke was giving a rebate then the f you did an install and the fed tax credit was 30%. I ended up only paying around $11,000 for that. After a year I realized I needed the storage and the Tesla powerwalls were coming down in price. I ended up getting three for around $9000 each.

The only problem with the second install was there was no tax credit for the batteries. I used Renu energy and they tied the install of the batteries with an additional 5lw of panels and everything qualified. I think that install was $40,000 out of pocket for me.
 

ChicagoFats

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I had two different systems installed. I bought an Enphase system the first time, around 11kw worth of panels but no storage. These worked well but I had no storage. Duke was giving a rebate then the f you did an install and the fed tax credit was 30%. I ended up only paying around $11,000 for that. After a year I realized I needed the storage and the Tesla powerwalls were coming down in price. I ended up getting three for around $9000 each.

The only problem with the second install was there was no tax credit for the batteries. I used Renu energy and they tied the install of the batteries with an additional 5lw of panels and everything qualified. I think that install was $40,000 out of pocket for me.

Thanks! So all in what would you say the system costs and how big of a house would that power?
 

LVRebel

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Thanks! So all in what would you say the system costs and how big of a house would that power?
Depends where you're at.

I put in a 7.5kW system about 9 years ago. I have a little over 4,000 SF, and it probably covers 60% of my costs over the year. But the heat and A/C here in the desert gets pretty high in the summer.
 

ChicagoFats

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Depends where you're at.

I put in a 7.5kW system about 9 years ago. I have a little over 4,000 SF, and it probably covers 60% of my costs over the year. But the heat and A/C here in the desert gets pretty high in the summer.

Do you feel like you got a good return on your investment?
 

LVRebel

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Do you feel like you got a good return on your investment?

TL/DR: Maybe. We've had issues with ours based on the install company and some hardware.

I've thought about that and I'm not sure, but there are a couple of reasons for that. The solar itself has been fine having it.

One issue though, is that the company that did our install went out of business, therefore, no warranty anymore on the system. There was a big issue about 5-8 years ago (at least where I am) where the power companies were pushing hard to reduce the buyback amount that they pay out to people with solar when they put energy back into the system. This caused a lot of people to stop putting in solar, and many companies went out of business.

Second issue is the company that made the micro-inverters that were installed at our house also went out of business around the same time, due to the reasons mentioned previously.

Third issue was how the system was sold to us. At the time, the gov't was putting in regulations requiring companies to push for renewable energy. When people install solar on their homes, they generated solar energy credits. Those solar energy credits could then be bundled by the solar companies and sold back to large corporations, at which time I would make money for selling the credits. However, since we have no solar company anymore, we aren't really able to do that. So we're still accumulating credits, but I think the system may have changed.

The good thing was that we got a decent rebate on the system (30% I think) when we put it in, so it was a decent value, and it's been lowering our cost of service every month for 10 years. The bad thing is we sized the system assuming we'd make money with those energy credits, which would have covered like 95-100% of our costs of energy. Instead, we still have to pay bills most months.
 

Rebarcock.

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going solar and thinking you're going off the grid is a step back. you paying cash?
They don't make an AC strong enough for you to stay cooled and be effective when it is 103 out and no sea breeze or there a hurricane band of storms. You fat bitch fucker
 

Rebarcock.

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If you're not a federal employee you owe no taxes which was always volunteer since WW2. Filing is more dangerous than not filing.

The next step is to change one's political status.
Can't get a loan to run a business wo filing taxes. But otherwise I agree on the federal level. Not on state taxes
 
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