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Green Corvette: The 82nd Airborne’s Rapid Deployment Process

Green Corvette

The sound of the engines hum throughout the hull of the C-130 aircraft. Sixty-four paratroopers sit anxiously, awaiting the jump commands. The jumpmaster calls out “ten minutes, get ready”. The outboard personnel stand up first, and then the inboard. The next command is to hook up. Each paratrooper hooks up his static line to the cable running along the inside of the airplane. The first jumper is told to “Stand by”. He moves into position facing the open door. He glances to his right where there is a red and green light. The green light comes on and the jumpmaster yells “Go!”. The soldier takes a broad step forward and performs his leap of faith. The opening shock of his canopy deploying sends a jolt throughout his body. He descends at a rate of 14 feet per second, and finally lands like a pile of bricks. This is the common task of airborne operations performed by the 82nd Airborne Division out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Airborne operations are what the 82nd is known for, however their true mission is to be ready to deploy anywhere in the world at a moment’s notice. They are known as a GRF (Global Response Force). When a paratrooper is on GRF-1 and gets the word that it’s time to go, the code word used is “Green Corvette”. There are several stages that occur when a Green Corvette is called, but the basics are: the prep phase, the mobilization phase, and the establishment phase.
Basically, the unit is always in the prep phase. Being active duty, it is the unit’s responsibility to remain vigilant and ready at all times but there are several key things that need to be accomplished when the unit gets the call. While on GRF-1 there is no alcohol permitted and travel anywhere outside a 25-mile radius is forbidden. Soldiers on GRF-1 should at all times be ready to receive the call telephonically and arrive at the company in less than 2 hours. Range time priority will go to the unit that is on GRF-1. All weapons must have been to the range to be zeroed and dialed in. All communications equipment should be tuned and programmed accordingly. Each soldier has a packing list that is laid out constantly to ensure they have everything that is needed for the deployment. This consists of a personal plate carrier with all attachments and pouches, all attire to include cold weather and wet weather gear, a sleeping system, and many other things that each soldier will need in the field and for combat. The unit will train vigorously, being evaluated on all battle drills and proficiency tasks. This consists of everyone from the individual soldier to a brigade-sized element.
Once all the prep work has been completed, it is time to move on to the mobilization phase. All of the unit’s vehicles and bigger belongings will be packaged for “heavy drops” or large items that cannot be carried. Once the unit receives the Green Corvette call, it has 2 hours to have responded and arrived at the company area of operation. Each soldier must arrive in field uniform with all belongings to include a ruck sack and “A” bag. The “B” bag has already been packaged and stored for the deployment. All personnel will then draw out all company-issued and sensitive items. This includes each soldier’s weapon with sight and other attachments, a night vision set, 7 magazines, any radio equipment, and a gas mask. Once the entire company has drawn all of its issued items, they will make their way to Green Ramp by bus. Green Ramp is the hub on Pope Air Force Base where the entirety of the 82nd flies out from, whenever and wherever they deploy to. From there, depending on the mission, the unit may or may not draw out parachutes. Once everyone who is moving out has arrived to Green Ramp and the pilots are ready to go, the unit will board the aircraft to fly out. If the mission is to deploy to somewhere in the Middle East, the flight could be anywhere from 12 to 16 hours, of course with fuel stops along the way.
Finally comes the establishment phase. Once the aircraft’s wheels have touched down overseas, there are already people put in motion to ensure the unit has barracks available, a meal plan is in place, and all the unit’s basic needs are taken care of. Typically, the unit will take this stop at a larger FOB, or Forward Operating Base. The FOB will have dining facilities as well as gyms, and other amenities to accommodate the soldiers during their short stay before moving to their respected area of operation within the country. Once all gear has been downloaded from the aircrafts and the unit has all their necessary equipment, it is time for the Operations Order to take place. This is a 5-paragraph briefing explaining the overall mission, to include situation, mission, execution, service and support, and command and signal. It will be discussed down to the final details of what to do and how to do it. After a couple days of climatization and receiving the mission briefings, it is time for the unit to break up into smaller units and move out to their specific areas, usually by either a Black Hawk or Chinook helicopter. It is typical to be broken down to the company level of operations, which is around 140 people. Sometimes it may be a larger force but usually it is no smaller than a company. Finally, once the unit arrives to their specific COP, or Combat Outpost, it is there where the incoming unit will do a couple-day sit down and walk around with the outgoing unit so that they can get to know their situation and where everything is taking place.
The whole event from start to finish takes about 4-6 days. The GRF system is vital as the world is continuously changing at a rapid pace. It allows for a unit to rapidly deploy within just a matter of hours. To look at it from the outside in, it is quite impressive that such a large element can go from a training state to a combat state in the matter of days. It takes a real professional to be an active duty paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne at all times, but especially when it comes to being a part of the Green Corvette, deploying at such a quick pace.
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ChicagoFats

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56 static line and 25 free falls

Im going to ask a dumb question, but here goes.

Free fall is fairly obvious. You jump out and free fall.

The static line .... is that what you connect to and does it automatically open your parachute? Or is there some other reason to connect to it? Is there a problem with people jumping out and not opening their parachutes?
 

Chris Farley

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Im going to ask a dumb question, but here goes.

Free fall is fairly obvious. You jump out and free fall.

The static line .... is that what you connect to and does it automatically open your parachute? Or is there some other reason to connect to it? Is there a problem with people jumping out and not opening their parachutes?
Yes static line is where it pulls the chute out for you. The line connects to a running cable inside the aircraft and the force with your weight pulls it open. Static line was the first method of parachuting. Free fall or skydiving is where you pull your own chute. Although there are instances where malfunctions occur, stats show it’s unlikely to be a catastrophic malfunction. In all my years during the Army, I knew of 3 deaths due to a total malfunction. (Several non life threatening injuries) Of course you have your reserve but after a certain distance, it’s useless. It takes about 3-5 seconds for it to deploy. Good questions.
 

BLatta12

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and also @Croot_Overlord, seems like this article, and other news articles, are not getting the love that it should. Can we incorporate it into the main forum somehow so that it gets more visibility?

We get alerts, but it doesnt get bumped to the top of the board and catch others attention.
This is the structure we have chosen to go forward with at this time. It is leaps and bounds in comparison to what we had with a completely separate news website and address where articles and comments went unnoticed. We are trying to promote articles in the forum by making a post when new articles come available.

I agree the articles need more love for the quality. We are hoping the FSF News takes off and becomes a reason people come to the Free Speech Forum.

You can also see news updates on the main page under news. Thanks for your feedback.

@JerBearr
 

JerBearr

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This is the structure we have chosen to go forward with at this time. It is leaps and bounds in comparison to what we had with a completely separate news website and address where articles and comments went unnoticed. We are trying to promote articles in the forum by making a post when new articles come available.

I agree the articles need more love for the quality. We are hoping the FSF News takes off and becomes a reason people come to the Free Speech Forum.

You can also see news updates on the main page under news. Thanks for your feedback.

@JerBearr
and also @Croot_Overlord, seems like this article, and other news articles, are not getting the love that it should. Can we incorporate it into the main forum somehow so that it gets more visibility?

We get alerts, but it doesnt get bumped to the top of the board and catch others attention.

We are working on a huge website upgrade .......I dont want to reveal too much information ;) .....
but I agree the news needs more love. The quality of work we're receiving is amazing, but the reach isn't as good as I think it should be.
 

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